Imperturbable

Title: Imperturbable

Medium: Oil on canvas

Artist: Dave Holmander-Bradford

Size: 36 x 36 inch.

Date 2020

Original is for sale $1900 contact artist through website or e-mail: daveholmander@gmail.com

Famous Christians Who Believed Evolution is Compatible with Christian Faith – Articles – BioLogos

The list includes some of the most influential Christians of the last 150 years, such as Billy Graham and C.S. Lewis.
— Read on biologos.org/articles/famous-christians-who-believed-evolution-is-compatible-with-christian-faith

Imitation 2019

Title: Imitation 2019

Medium: Acrylic on canvas

Artist: Dave Holmander-Bradford

Size: 24 X 30

Date 2019

Imitation 2019 a

Ecological Thought: Maasai Land Critique

Maasai Land Critique

by

Dave Holmander-Bradford

June 9, 2019

A cursory reading of both articles reveals the two complement each other, because, they buttress nicely together without overly repeating material researched in one and presented a second time by the other.  Environmental Justice Case Study, by Julie Narimatsu, offers an examination of the roots to the historical issues confronting the Maasai’ tribes of Kenya and Tanzania by bringing context to the ongoing conflict and inequities. My opinion about Narimatsu’s writing style and the argument is less favorable than Hughes. There are numerous places where specific points are stated without providing context and background to the reader.

Hughes, in Land Alienation and Contestation in Kenyan Maasailand, writes in an easy manner, briefly references some historical markers throughout as necessary to bring context to the contemporary interpretation while providing up to date analyses of current standing and a possible path forward by suggesting solutions applicable to the 21st century.   

Narimatsu begins to lay out her argument in a very detailed structure. Immediately, the case for discourse identifies the problem (p. 1). “Maasai Tribes of Kenya and Tanzania have endured a long history of colonization by the British” (p.1). The case references the displacement of the indigenous people who are supplanted to undesirable arid lands and negates the nomadic nature and social sensibilities of their culture engaging in a lively pastoralist (Narimatsu, p.1). There is every indication this action has commercial interests in favor of settling white Europeans in the lush grazing land of the Maasai’. The effect created an environmental calamity; because the Maasai’ are forced to overgraze an arid land not sustainable for year-round grazing and orchestrates displacement of wildlife. A social backlash ensued continuing into this day. The evidence provided points to coercion and brute force to extract them from their native lands. 

I found a few examples where I was questioning the arrangement of facts cited within Narimatsu’s article, i.e., “The Maasai people probably arrived in East Africa during the 15th century A.D.” (p.1) which is contrast to “They have interacted with the land, sustainably, for thousands of years by migrating in order to allow the grass to regenerate” (p.3). These two statements appear to contradict each other; therefore, they weaken the credibility of the discourse.The strength of the article provides an overview of the historical context of the Maasai’ peoples plight, while squarely placing blame on its colonial intruders and a litany of misdeeds from within their indigenous society.

In the abstract of Land Alienation and Contestation in Kenyan Maasailand, Hughes states the goal of the article. In spite of the forced removal of the pastoral Maasai’ people, they now have a voice in their future with a new constitution; however, Fifty percent (50%) of their former common land is held in private hands, and it is unlikely to be returned. It is, also, unlikely their common pastoralists lifestyle will be restored (Hughes, p.1). However; Hughes, cited an example of a younger generation stepping to the fore, willing to take ownership of the current situation and forge a new path forward (p.14). The article is loaded with specific anecdotal facts and first-person oral accounts.   Hughes does not gloss over the troubled pass. He offers some positive changes which, if pursued, could provide some sense of dignity and restoration to the Maasai’ people.  Identifying systemic problem, Hughes says, “patronage resource by political leaders, who call in favors” (p.5), and “colonial intervention in Maasailand led to the breakdown of traditional ecosystems” (p.7) lead to these problems; however, there are five specific actions (p.10) listed which offer positive change. These actions if continued, provide some sense of dignity and restoration to the Maasai’ people.

In summary, I find both articles provide an important voice, one to past grievances because it set the foundation to a claim against injustices, while the other to a positive path forward. Hughes is pragmatic, the road ahead will not be an easy one; but, the Maasai’ people will need to take advantage of a variety of measures, using all means available, social pressure, political will, and litigation. In doing so, the Maasai’ people might be able to right past wrongs and become proud owners of their destiny.

Work cited:

Narimatsu, Julie, Environmental Justice Case Study: Maasai Land Rights in Kenya and Tanzania, date unknown, MS, AUNE.

Hughes, L., Land Alienation and Contestation in Kenyan Maasailand, date unknown, MS, ANUE.

Ecological Thought: Personal Paper on Nature

Personal Paper on Nature

By

Dave Holmander-Bradford

            The presence I feel of the Creator has always been part of my outdoor experience. From my earliest days spending time traveling to the mountains with my family to walk in the grandeur of trees or to the rocky coast of Maine to feel the sea spray, this sense of presence a constant when in nature. There is a moist, deep, damp air in the woods, which has its own unique fragrance. It is to be compared to the deserts in Southern California which are dry warm and arid; always the same, yet different. Though the particular place changes, the outdoors always seems like home. The challenge to pick a single place in nature or experience is an ominous task. How do you describe home in the outdoors? Is it the smoke from a campfire or driving a tent stake in the ground or standing over a waterfall; that is a part of my natural experience? 

            The year was 1973, and I was just twenty-five years old, a veteran having served during the Vietnam era, having constructed my own stick build house on the coast of Maine, and a student at the White Mountains Seminary in Lancaster, New Hampshire. On a late spring, Sunday immediately after morning service, a small group of us students decided it was the perfect time to hike Mt. Jefferson. The mountainis named after President Jefferson. It is part Presidential Range. I remember the day; it was beautiful and sunny; you could feel the warmth of the spring air in the lower elevations.  However, when we arrived atthe trailhead in Jefferson, New Hampshire by U.S. Route 2, we could see there was still some snow cover. No one blinked an eye, and off we went. The demographics of our hiking party weremixed gender and several older people. By old, I mean they were like 40 years old.

The trail was moist from the winter’s snowfall but marked. The first three or four miles was a gentle grade; however, as we got deeper into the woods, the climb intensified. Our first grand view came when we reached what was known as the lower Jefferson Summit, sometimes called a false summit, because it is what your eye catches. You never see the real summit until you arrive at the lower summitfirst.  The evergreen trees are low, almost like shrubs, with flecks of twigs scattered on the ground. There is a serene beauty, the air is crisp, and we are tracking through a few inches of snow.

Suddenly, one of the older women cries out with a scream. We all rush to her side; she is lying on the ground in excruciating pain. Fortunately, one of the other students had been a medic in the Army. He checks her out and says, you have broken your ankle. Our hiking adventure has ended abruptly. There is an eerie feeling which develops. Others stepped in and take charge; one person says, we must make a litter and carry her down. Someone else volunteered their coat. Others find downed tree branches which become poles. We have perhaps started too late in the day for this climb. Now with the delay of getting organized for the decent, nightfall will soon be upon us.

            In spite of all the confusion, there is a strange manifestation which envelops our space in the woods. It feels like a controlling force is in charge. I liken it to nature, guiding us safely down the mountain. The trek down the mountain will be tenuous, yet no one else slipped or fell. The constant wind which we had felt subsided and the moon came out to guide our path. To our amazement, with perhaps still two miles to go we are met by a group of locals hiking with flashlights heading in our direction. Somehow, they have heard of the injured woman and come to assist. The added help is much appreciated. It is incredible when exiting the woods, to find an ambulance is already waiting to care for our fellow student. You ask is, there something special about this place? Was nature trying to tell me something?

 I answer, yes, I could not see him or her or it. You, my listener, choose your perspective or manifestation of the divine. My interpretation of the moment, as evidenced by the presence I feel. He was there to guide and protect, as often He does, with flickering moonlight and forest depth; because, He, God is everywhere.

Green Space Ecological Attitudes in Southern Coos County, NH

Final Project: Research Proposal with Human Participants

1. Name of Principal Investigator.

Dave Holmander-Bradford

2. Project Title.

Green Space Ecological Attitudes in Southern Coos County,NH

3.  Start. Expected starting date for data collection. 

August 1, 2019

4.  End. The expected completion date for data collection.

January 31, 2020

5. Project Purpose.

The findings will be utilized by town governments in developing green space and the viability of projects succeeding in those particular communities or areas? Respondents will answer the question, would green space benefit the community by offering lifestyle choices, promoting eco-tourism, and identifying ecological sites?

6. Participants.

Research focus is 21 years plus, with participation rate of 20 percent of the target community, e.g., Whitefield population is 2200. Average voter turnout of four hundred. To clarify, participants will be divided into two groups labeled “renters” and “owners”? It is believed that property owners have a higher participation rate in voting than renters; and, there could be a direct economic impact on them through local taxes when setting aside new green space.

Gender and age will be collected in the research and tabulated in the coding process, but it will be incidental to the study.

7. Selection.

Research participants will be identified as either general public or community leader. A broad sampling of the general public in the rural target community will be encouraged to participate in the research. The notification process to participate in the study will be orchestrated through public notices posted instrategic locations, e-mail, newspaper, and word of mouth.

Ten community leaders will be asked to participate in a separate interview process. Their specific input is viewed as vital because some of these individuals could be the final decision makers if new green spaces are allowed to be developed.

8. Procedures. 

The research survey has three specific processes for collecting data. The first two are identified as online survey and paper survey, each with ten questions using the Likert scale and the opportunity to provide written comments; and, the third method will be interviewing community leaders.

The paper and online surveys will be completely anonymous. All community members will have the chance to participate in these.

The researcher believes there is a value-weighted judgment to be obtained from the strategic community leaders. The interview survey method use constitutes this process. The researcher will develop a set of uniform questions, e.g., When I mention green space, what is the first thing that comes to mind? Answer will be recorded keeping handwritten notes.

The empirical data will receive a code in a generic format. Written comments will also be assessed to determine their theme, which will then be assigned a code. Information collected from community leaders will be collated thematically, coded and combined with the other data presented as qualitative data analysis.

The researcher does not envision any other methods of inquiry; however, the analysis may be expanded to a series of small group discussionsto receive additional information. This would be triggered because of the favorability in green space indicated from early returns to the online and paper surveys.

9. Harm.

a. Risk.

The research will collect data on public acceptance of new green space. Informationwill be used to inform the community of the feasibility in establishing new green space because the community has indicated it either supports or does not support new green space. Research is limited to personal preference and does not convey any negative impact. 

     b. Benefits.

The research will provide the community with critical data when planning new green space. Decision makers will have a clear understanding of the community’s acceptance or rejection of new green space and its willingness to support any projects.

10. Privacy.

The research provides optimal privacy; the bulk of the research data is collected anonymously, and the interview worksheets of community leaders will have no identifiable personal information.

The solo researcher will record each of his findings on separate interview worksheets. The ten community leaders interviewed will be conducted separately. The only purpose of the separate checklist will be identifying community leader interviews completed, and those who are not. This checklist may be destroyed once 10 interviews are complete.

The researcher who conducted the interviews will not participate in the coding of the interview worksheets.

11. Paradigm.

The research uses two distinct paradigms. The paper survey and online survey fit within the postpositivist paradigmbecause the researcher has established a clear distance between the subject and himself while seeking incomplete ontological feedback. The epistemology is modified objectivist because research data is mostly subjective and qualitative.

The interview process is constructivist because theontology revolvesaround a dynamic social relationship between the interviewer and subject. The epistemology supports the subjective nature of the interview and the methodology is hermeneutical.

Maasai Land Critique

Holmander, Dave

Instructors: James Gruber and Patience Stoddard

ES-7000 Ecological Thought

June 9, 2019

Maasai Land Critique

A cursory reading of both articles reveals the two complement each other, because, they buttress nicely together without overly repeating material researched in one and presented a second time by the other.  Environmental Justice Case Study, by Julie Narimatsu, offers an examination of the roots to the historical issues confronting the Maasai’ tribes of Kenya and Tanzania by bringing context to the ongoing conflict and inequities. My opinion about Narimatsu’s writing style and the argument is less favorable than Hughes. There are numerous places where specific points are stated without providing context and background to the reader.

Hughes, in Land Alienation and Contestation in Kenyan Maasailand, writes in an easy manner, briefly references some historical markers throughout as necessary to bring context to the contemporary interpretation while providing up to date analyses of current standing and a possible path forward by suggesting solutions applicable to the 21st century.   

Narimatsu begins to lay out his argument in a very detailed structure. Immediately, the case for discourse identifies the problem (p. 1). “Maasai Tribes of Kenya and Tanzania have endured a long history of colonization by the British” (p.1). The case references the displacement of the indigenous people who are supplanted to undesirable arid lands and negates the nomadic nature and social sensibilities of their culture engaging in a lively pastoralist (Narimatsu, p.1). There is every indication this action has commercial interests in favor of settling white Europeans in the lush grazing land of the Maasai’. The effect created an environmental calamity; because the Maasai’ are forced to overgraze an arid land not sustainable for year-round grazing and orchestrates displacement of wildlife. A social backlash ensued continuing into this day. The evidence provided points to coercion and brute force to extract them from their native lands. 

I found a few examples where I was questioning the arrangement of facts cited within the article, i.e., “The Maasai people probably arrived in East Africa during the 15th century A.D.” (background, p.1) which is contrast to “They have interacted with the land, sustainably, for thousands of years by migrating in order to allow the grass to regenerate” (key actors, p.3). These two statements appear to contradict each other; therefore, they weaken the credibility of the discourse.The strength of the article provides an overview of the historical context of the Maasai’ peoples plight, while squarely placing blame on its colonial intruders and a litany of misdeeds from within their indigenous society.

In the abstract of Land Alienation and Contestation in Kenyan Maasailand, Hughes states the goal of the article. Because of the forced removal of the pastoral Maasai’ people, even though a new constitution is in place, wherein, they now have a voice, 50% of their former common land is held in private hands, and it is unlikely to be returned and their common pastoralists lifestyle restored (Hughes, p.1). However; Hughes, cited an example of a younger generation stepping to the fore willing to take ownership of the current situation and forge a new path forward (p.14). The article is loaded with specific anecdotal facts and first-person oral accounts.   Hughes does not gloss over the troubled pass. He offers some positive changes which if pursued, could provide some sense of dignity and restoration to the Maasai’ people.  Identifying systemic problem, Hughes says, “patronage resource by political leaders, who call in favors” (p.5), and “colonial intervention in Maasailand led to the breakdown of traditional ecosystems” (p.7) lead to these problems; however, there are five specific (p.10) actions listed which offer positive change. These actions if continued would provide some sense of dignity and restoration to the Maasai’ people.

In summary, I find both articles provide an important voice, one to past grievances because it set the foundation to a claim against injustices, while the other to a positive path forward. Hughes is pragmatic, the road ahead will not be an easy one; but, the Maasai’ people will need to take advantage of a variety of measure, using all means available, social pressure, political will, and litigation. In doing so, the Maasai’ people might be able to right past wrongs and become proud owners of their own destiny.

Work cited:

Narimatsu, Julie, Environmental Justice Case Study: Maasai Land Rights in Kenya and Tanzania, date unknow, MS, AUNE.

Hughes, L., Land Alienation and Contestation in Kenyan Maasailand, date unknow, MS, ANUE.

Portland Museum of Art 11-19-2016, Portland, Maine

Portland Museum of Art 11-19-2016 

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 David Holmander  at Monday, November 21, 2016 8:47:34 AM EST

Museum Visit #3 to Portland Museum of Art
November 19th 2016
By Dave Holmander


The Portland Museum of Art, or PMA, is the largest and oldest public art institution in the U.S. state of Maine. Founded as the Portland Society of Art in 1882, it is located in the downtown area known as The Arts District in Portland, Maine.

It turns out that the day of my visit there was to be a walking tour of the museum focusing on sculpture. It in-fact turns out I was the only person who showed. After a brief introduction to my tour guide Docent Hal Norvell himself a sculpture and learning that I was an artist using found objects to create narrative sculpture moved forward with the tour.

The PMA is by comparison a small museum with a limited budge though it boast five or six building one being dedicated to housing the work of Winslow Homer and so named. It’s exhibitions cover the neoclassic to contemporary art as well live and interactive show and readings of poetry etc. Not to be lost is they have a great shop to purchase select items and there snack bar offers some really good food. That alone might be a reason to visit.

By example on the same day I visited the museum there was a marathon reading of Moby Dick by rotation of volunteers. There also was a Illustrator’s Dilemma workshop,  and a film premiere . It is very much endeavoring to live up to it theme Your Museum, Reimagined.

The first of five specific work I wish to mention is The Dead Pearl Diver. 1858 by Benjamin Paul Akers in marble. I question the lighting effects and did Hal  because it is central to a windowed rotunda diminishing any effective optically. It is surrounded by 5 other work also by him. Several observant consideration besides lighting is the vantage point of the viewer assessable from 360 degrees. Considering the view point the impression perceived could be quite different. From the face side one is considerate of the workmanship of the artist and his helpers. Helper, yes, because this final scale up work was completed indirectly by production craft people. From the far side the morbidity of death is experienced.

The next piece is Hero and Leander circa 1949 by Robert Laurent. Like the previous there where several other of his works on display one note worthy because it was in mahogany. The uniqueness of this work poses questions about proportions and scale. One also ask, was the work altered or redesigned because of the size of limestone? Unlike the work of Akers it is direct sculpture.

Next in acrylic and book pages on canvas is the contemporary conceptual work of Lehmann Maupin, Where Do We Go From Here, 2008  He sight a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr. titles with the same name and is his attempt to convey that speech through the visual spectrum. Questioning the plight of the poor via economic repression and the distribution of wealth.

The next work I found great soles in because it reminded me of a few artifact which are included in my installation for the next residence. It will not be to the scale of this work but includes pieces of wood from an old railway station blacked by years of decay. Number 139, 2010 again contemporized theme found painted wood by Leonardo Drew.

The last work from the visit by artist Nicole Wittenberg, Lily, 2010 and Untitled, 2010 both Oil on Linen I also found very intriguing because I felt and identify to each. She uses a heavy brush stroke and is very lucid in application. I place her work as Eccentric Sentimentality and though not shown at PMA some work is very provocative.


Her short bio read
Nicole Wittenberg is an American artist based in New York City. She was awarded the American Academy of Arts and Letters coveted John Koch Award for best young figurative painter in 2012. Wittenberg was born in San Francisco, CA, and received her BFA from the San Francisco Art Institute in 2003. Her work is featured in several prominent collections. She is a teacher at the Bruce High Quality Foundation University and the New York Studio School of Drawing, Painting and Sculpture.

Museum Visit Two DeCordova Museum First Semester By Dave Holmander October 26, 2016

Museum Visit Two 

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 David Holmander  at Tuesday, October 25, 2016 4:36:09 PM EDT

Museum Visit Two 
DeCordova Museum 
First Semester 
By  
Dave Holmander  
October 26, 2016 

The occasion for the visit was in concert with a group visit by the first semester MFA Visual program students at NHIA lead by our first semester mentor Craig Stockwell. His work being on exhibition in the “Biennial 2016 Show”. 

The exhibition highlights the work of New England artists and their resent contribution to contemporary art. Among the unique criteria of this show it is by invitation only and to be asked is considered quite an honor. In all fourteen artist were invited for the 2016 display from all the New England States.  

Craig gave us a walk through for his work and you could see that he was very please to have been one the distinguished artist in the exhibition as he should. His work was displayed at one end of a large viewing gallery on a raised section liked to a stage with alcoves on either side. The main work of un-stretched  canvas an installation of two mirrored work on the center wall. In the middle of the installation where pieces which protruded from the wall with some hinged pieces creating a cast shadow and/or imagery of the mirrored work. The most profouned work was in the left alcove and it conveyed a very personal connection. It was done when his daughter was in Egypt during the recent revolution. It is title Leaving Egypt 2011-2014, oil on canvasd 

Other works view where Lamia, 2015 pen and ink with string on antiquarian paper (contrasting side profiles of the same face looking at each other one seemingly mirrored) and Monday or Tuesday 2015, oil, ink and silver wire on linen (imagery form of script marking emblematic Asian origin) both by Jason Noushin. 

A final artist to mention is Cary Smith, Among her works were Shapes #1, 2016 yellow and red-blue boarder and Stripes #3, 2016 with 4 color border, oil on linen. 
The visit was beneficial and informing with wide a variety and contextualized style ranging from traditional New England landscape to abstract and still life.